Tuesday, July 25, 2006

Socks and shawls

seem to be the only knit items I get done. So the knitting content again is a pair of socks and a shawl.

Thank you for the comments on the knitting bags. I had not been sewing for a long time and it was nice the break the barrier between the sewing machine and me. I hope to do a bit more sewing in the coming weeks...

Had this message in the inbox this morning:

"We have dreamcatcher shawls here in south west Ireland - you spread them over the rocks on a summer evening when the seals are singing, and when you bring the shawl home, it brings wonderful legends and stories with it." from Jo of http://celticmemoryyarns.blogspot.com .

This seemed like a good reason to take the finished shawl again to the lake side; there aren't any seals singing but surely there are other creatures singing their own stories out there (maybe if you listened very carefully you could hear the water carry an ode a distant bear is singing to ripening cloudberries), so here let me present the
Frost and Ice Shawl...


It is blocked if you were in doubt... While knitting I grew suspicious of the big manmade fiber content of the yarn, I realized that it might not block out nice and even but I had knit so much then already that I hoped it would come out at least decent. Plus the fact that you can't frog this yarn Garnstudio's Vivaldi. The shawl is light and can be worn over a coat wrapped loosely around a neck. The shawl matches the knee highs I knit for my daughter Nadja some time ago and

I could not remember if I have showed you these knee highs finished. (Mr Cat always comes running down to the lake side if someone takes even one step towards there. We have a fish trap in the lake to catch small fish for him and he just loves the fresh fish.)

The yarn here was Lizaknit sock yarn in colorway Garnet. (See the wrinkles around the ankle, I have not seen them before she has tried these on and now I have to check that, somehow I think it is because she had long johns underneath and just did not pull the socks up high properly...)

The nights have been quite brisk lately. Almost two weeks ago the temperature dropped down to zero and in some areas the berries had frostbites and were gone. But indeed we have been enjoying strawberries and cloudberries a lot lately. (Soon there will be blueberries and then cranberries... the berry season boosts the sock knitting hence the rubber boots.)

My summer kitchen I have not been able to use, I don't remember when I cooked by the fire. And the reason is that we have had so little rain over the summer that the surroundings are so dreadfully dry that to light a fire even though it is on this iron surface and inside a kota is hazardous and it has been advised by the officials not to light fires. Strange summer weather once again. But thanks to dryness there has not been that many mosquitoes either.

I though that I had one more thing to talk about but although I have been sitting here in front of this keyboard for ten minutes I can't remember what is was... Maybe it was not important after all.

36 comments:

  1. Gorgeous socks and that shawl looks lovely .

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  2. I love the shawl, the way it flows and has dips and rises, makes it somehow seaweedy, mermaidy and romantic though it is red!

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  3. Lene I am forever in awe of the beautiful fine knitting you do. I really love the colors and they both look so romantic with the summer colors on the lake.
    It has been another odd summer here in the midwest too. Although I would rather it be the crisp autumn already ;)

    P.S. What is a cloudberry?

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  4. Beautifuls socks and shawl!

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  5. I like the soft bobbing of the shawl.

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  6. Beautiful. I feel like I have had a personal visit with you when I read your posts.

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  7. The shawl is just beautiful! I think it was good that you used the manmade yarn, it left quite a lot of the texture of the lace there, that would maybe have been lost with a wool.

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  8. aw, lene, those things are beautiful. i love those particular reds—not too bright. the shawl is gorgeous, deeply textured and smushy—mmmm, but also light and airy!
    zero degrees already! oh my. the temperatures here have been fluctuating more this summer than last, but one thing is sure; august will be the hottest month i think. i wish we had your lack of mosquitoes . . .

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  9. what a great idea, to take your knitting to nature so it will soak it up and you can bring it home!
    I love the socks- just perfect for the big wellies.

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  10. Very beautiful. Both the socks and shawl are lovely, as is the model.

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  11. The shawl has such lovely feminine drape!

    After losing all interest in a sock I have attempted, yours are an inspiration. I prefer knee socks anyway, so I'll look in that direction next.

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  12. What a beautiful shawl. I love all about it. And the socks are gorgeous, too. Your knitting is simply exquisite.
    I can't believe the temperature already dropped to zero. Pity about the berries, but I so wish I was there instead of sweltering in California.

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  13. Do you mind telling us what kind of heel is on your socks? I love it! If it's in a book or something let me know which book so I can try it myself. Thanks so much! They are lovely.

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  14. The socks are beautiful!

    I meant to comment about the bags the other day too, they might just be the most adorable thing I've ever seen. :)

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  15. Beautiful knitting, and a beautiful legend! I love that idea. I wonder if it works by rivers with a Clapotis? I'll have to try it when we visit my inlaws.
    Also, your bags inspired me to get back to my machine and try out a little bag of my own. It almost makes me want to put down the needles and finish that quilt!

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  16. I always love reading your posts! What is the cat's name? I have one that looks just like it! I love cats!

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  17. All that vivid red is so exciting! The shawl is beautiful, of course (all of Sharon Miller's designs are) but it's the knee socks that I really like. Your own pattern, I think?

    Anyway, you must be glad of the new warm knitwear if frost is already starting to appear in your part of the world. How strange it is to think of frost in July, in the northern hemisphere! It really makes me appreciate just how far north you and your family live.

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  18. Those knee highs take my breath away. As always your writing and knitting are works of art. Thank you for sharing!

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  19. Anonymous21:15

    Your knitting and photography (and drawings )
    always inspire me. There is a spiritual and uplifting element in everything you do. I do think that if you had the time putting together a book would be something I would very much like to see ( starting with the stocking pattern). You could use your own photography and drawings because they is so outstanding.

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  20. It's been an oddly dry summer here too, Lene, and the hills around are red-brown when they should be the emerald green that everyone associates with Ireland. Normally a bush fire is a joke in Ireland because everything is always so wet, but right now I wouldn't want to light even the smallest campfire out of doors. Fortunately, it is never too long before the soft dampness returns - it's just a bit delayed this year. Your mention of the long johns under the gorgeous socks is a salutary reminder of how climates vary. Our blackberries are nearly ripe! With love.
    Jo
    celticmemoryyarns.blogspot.com

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  21. What a birdbrain! Forgot to say the shawl is utterly, utterly beautiful. You could wrap one of the Little People in it and they wouldn't want to go back to Tir na N'Og.

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  22. How pretty, both the shawl and socks. Your daughter is very lucky. On a different note, there is a band from Finland (Gjallerhorn) performing at our Scandinavian festival this weekend in western New York state (USA). I have one of their CD's so am looking forward to seeing them. I will think of you.

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  23. I love that shawl! I am at the cottage and the sounds we hear on our lake are lovely loon songs, both day and night. There are two pairs on our lake this year. Even in the wee hours of the morning we hear their haunting voices. Do you have them in Finland? By the way, I am surprised that you are getting strawberries now. Ours were finished weeks ago. We have delicious raspberries on our cottage property.

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  24. Diane04:02

    I-am-saying-what-everyone-else-has-said:Beautiful-shawl,beautiful-socks.I-also-would-like-to-know-what-a-"cloudberry"-is.And-I-agree-with-"Anonymous"-about-doing-your-own-book.Your-spirit/artist's-eye-really-comes-through-in-your-knitting!

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  25. Both the socks and the shawl are lovely! That must be your daughter standing there with the shawl.

    Ah, to explaing cloudberries to someone who's never seen or tasted one... I've tried many times, and every time I'm left with a feeling that I didn't do a very good job, and the other person still has no clue what they are like. It's just like nothing you've ever tasted before. :) Saying that they look like orange raspberries doesn't even start to describe them...

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  26. I can't remember seeing the socks finished before, they look so warm. Your shawl is just so beautiful.

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  27. What magic you impart to the everyday with your writing. Just beautiful--the knitting, too!
    --Amanda

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  28. ...and the thought of a distant bear singing a song to ripening cloudberries is so lovely it's out of this world.
    Jo
    celticmemoryyarns.blogspot.com

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  29. I am also happy with shawl knitting. Is it because it does not need to "fit", as in a sweater, or it could be gifted to anyone - no need to worry about size! Or is it the thrill of the article after blocking? I don't know, but I love to knit shawls and I loved the story of catching the song of the seals in the shawl, I could take mine to the ocean here, as the salmon will return before we know it, and, of course, the seals return as well. Did you know that cloudberries also grow in Newfoundland, Canada?

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  30. I think our kitties need a play date, although I don't think Nehemiah will agree to the plane trip. LOL!

    Love the socks and the shall. How beautiful!

    I do hope you get to cook in your summer kitchen. I loved the pictures from last year. I'm going to be cooking over the fire this weekend.

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  31. Alas, socks and stockings only wrinkle over slender ankles. What I wouldn't give...

    Glad to see the "Legs" model making another appearance.

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  32. Esther Bourgault05:34

    I'm always delighted to read on your blog, so much freshness and simplicity,and above all, art and beautiful needlework...Your socks make me dream ! They're so wonderful and delicate...
    Esther from Canada

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  33. Anonymous06:22

    Oh Lene
    That shawl is just lovely.
    And, thank you for writing about the weather and light at this time of year. I'm surprised that it's starting to get cooler already. IT'S JULY- doesn't the weather realize that?
    Margie

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  34. Mary Jo19:28

    Beautiful, dreamy shawl. It's always wonderful to catch your postings about the weather. Here, in England it's just very hot and sticky. Too hot to knit; my hands come out in a rash, so I sit here and read about others knitting.

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  35. The shawl, the picture of it at the lake, and the story to go with it are lovely. I hope it carries many beautiful stories. The weather here is changing also, small changes to the leaves, more dew in the mornings.

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  36. The shawl is so beautiful. And those socks are just lovely.

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